Freelance Graphic Designer

Freelance Graphic Designer

Graphic Design & Print Industry Professional since 1988.
freelance Graphic Designer since 2005

David Mears - Freelance Graphic Designer For Gift Vouchers

A5 Leaflet Designer . . .

David Mears - Freelance Graphic Designer and A5 Leaflet Designer in Essex, UK
David Mears - Freelance Graphic Designer and A5 Leaflet Designer in Essex, UK
David Mears - Freelance Graphic Designer and A5 Leaflet Designer in Essex, UK

Logo & Branding Designer . . .

Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK
Freelance Logo and Graphic Designer David Mears in the UK

DL Leaflet & Brochure Designer . . .

DL Leaflet Design by UK Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears
DL Leaflet Design by UK Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears
DL Leaflet Design by UK Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears
DL Leaflet Design by UK Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears

Roller Banner Designer . . .

Roller Banner Design for Anglia Courier Express by Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears
Roller Banner Design for Thomas Yorke by UK Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears
Roller Banner Design for Yelo Taxi by Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears
Freelance Graphic Designer & Golf Scorecard Designer David Mears
Freelance Graphic Designer & Golf Scorecard Designer David Mears
Freelance Web Design & Content Writer in the UK

Content Writer

Freelance Web Designer & Photographer in the UK

Photographer

Every Design Decision Made with Your Brand in Mind

Advanced Skills in Adobe InDesign, Photoshop & Illustrator

Freelance Adobe InDesign Designer in the UK, David Mears
Freelance Adobe Photoshop Designer & Web Designer David Mears
Freelance Adobe Illustrator Designer & Web Designer David Mears
Leaflet Design by Freelance Web & Graphic Designer David Mears

Leaflets

Advert Design by Freelance Web & Graphic Designer David Mears

Adverts

Postcard Design by Freelance Web & Graphic Designer David Mears

Postcards

Business Card Design by Freelance Web & Graphic Designer David Mears

Business Cards

Freelance Web Designer for Air Conditioning Companies

Also an Experienced Freelance Web Designer

Freelance Web Design and On-Page SEO Expert David Mears
Freelance Web Design and On-Page SEO Expert David Mears

A Keen Golfer . . . but a better Freelance Graphic Designer!

Freelance Web Designer & Keen Golfer David Mears
Freelance Web Designer & Keen Golfer David Mears
Freelance Web Designer & Keen Golfer David Mears
Freelance Web Designer & Keen Golfer David Mears

I Also Enjoy the Occasional Adventure . . .

A View From Helvellyn - Photograph Taken by Freelance Web Designer David Mears
A View From Ben Nevis. A Photograph Taken by Freelance UK Photographer David Mears
A View From Snowdon. A Photograph Taken by Freelance UK Photographer David Mears
David Mears on Scafell Pike,  the highest mountain in England

If I sound like the type of freelance graphic designer you’d like to work with, you’re very welcome to contact me.

Benefits of using Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears

You pay on a project-by-project basis with no long-term contracts or tie-ins.

No need to concern yourself with PAYE, sick pay, holiday or pension schemes.

The investment in the technology, equipment & industry leading software has already been made.

You benefit from my graphic design experience, skills & knowledge that can only be acquired by working as a freelance graphic designer since 2005.

I can help you ensure brand-consistency across your offline & online marketing through being able to provide you with graphic design, web design, content writing, photography & image retouching services.

I can also help with your social media presence, posts and content.

And, I can help you create Press Advertising campaigns to be on-brand and compliment your website and online presence.

About Freelance Graphic Designer David Mears

Becoming a freelance graphic designer wasn’t what I had in mind when I was at school. In fact, for reasons I have yet to understand, I actually wanted to become a marine biologist (I suspect David Attenborough Life on Earth was a major influence, as were Jacques Cousteau‘s Undersea World). Careers advice in the ’80s wasn’t what it is now and I was left without guidance on how to make a living exploring the Great Barrier Reef. I was, however, good at art and (in my teacher’s words) had “natural creative flair”. Therefore I decided that Art College was my best option for educational advancement. Back then there were Youth Training Schemes (YTS) – I can’t be sure, but wonder if these were the precursor of today’s apprenticeships as the incentive of a YTS was that students (or ‘youths’) got paid whilst learning.

The art colleges I visited simply didn’t appeal to me, and the opportunity of earning whilst I learned seemed like too good an opportunity so I embarked on a YTS in Commercial Art at Kinsgway Princeton College in Clerkenwell, London which promised to provide me commercial art skills and turn me into a graphic designer. Between leaving school and starting my YTS, I was offered the opportunity of work experience at a Typesetters, also in Clerkenwell. Now, only those of a certain age with knowledge of print will know what a typesetter was but if you’re too young to know…

Before Apple revolutionised Desktop Publishing, there were computers known as “Typesetting Machines”. The company where I had work experience had four typesetting machines manufactured by a company then called Xenotron and each supposedly costing £250k. Each machine was the size of a large dining room table and had a small (probably about 8 inch?) square screen which displayed, in green, text typed on the built-in keyboard.

Operated by skilled typesetters, the machines were able to format text into columns of specified width and height. Each machine was connected to a PMT (Photo Mechanical Transfer) machine which, much like 35mm cameras, ‘exposed’ the data sent by the typesetting machines onto light-sensitive paper which when developed using a special machine filled with chemicals produced very long sheets of paper with many, many columns of text.

These sheets of paper were then passed to the “paste-up artists” – this was where I came in! Our job was to manually, by hand, using drawing boards and Rotring pens, mark out the required page sizes. We would then cut the columns using a steel ruler and scalpel (I still have my original scalpel!) out of the long sheets of paper, apply melted wax to the back (using a special machine) and then stick it into the previously marked out pages. The soft wax meant the paper could be gently manoeuvred to ensure perfect horizontal alignment using the sliding parallel rule attached to the drawing board.

I vividly remember the first time I was shown how to draw perfectly square boxes using Rotring pens, by drawing the two sides, then making the top and bottom lines wider than the sides, then scratching the dried ink off using a scalpel. I recall the paper was called “CS10” paper which had a special coating which could be gently scraped off, thus allowing Rotring-drawn rules and tick marks to be perfectly square.

I thoroughly enjoyed my work experience, but the time came to start the YTS…which was awful! Not only was the content poorly delivered and the lessons conducted in a damp smelling, brick-walled cellar, but there was also a girl on the same YTS with horribly bad halitosis who took a shine to me and kept getting unpleasantly close. Yuk. Soon after starting the YTS, I was offered a full-time job back at the typesetters – I don’t think I even asked what the salary would be, I just accepted and was glad to be leaving the YTS and Girty Bad-Breath behind me.

My role as a full-time employee at the typesetters was slightly different to my work experience as I had become “The Junior” and spent a lot of time running errands and navigating my way around London on foot taking proofs to and collecting from clients. I also learned what it was like to work in a business where three of the six employees were sons of one of the owners. Two of them were very nice, but the other for some reason took a distinct dislike to me and later became the reason I left.

Another difference in my role, however, was that I was able to work with a professional graphic designer called Raj Thambi. An incredibly talented and busy freelance graphic designer who took me under his wing. Without realising, my experience of typesetting, paste-up and working with Raj was giving me knowledge and skills that would hold me in good stead when I was to later became a freelance graphic designer.

A real turning point for me was when the company was offered to the opportunity of evaluating a new type of computer which, it was claimed by the manufacturers, was going to revolutionise design for print, heralding a new age of “desktop publishing”…and the manufacturer was a virtually unknown company called ‘Apple‘.

I went to collect the new-fangled computer; it was not much larger than two shoe boxes, had a built-in carry handle, separate keyboard, a never before seen device called a mouse, a 6-inch screen capable of displaying various shades of grey and a 5¼ inch floppy disc drive…and I loved it! This computer, tiny in comparison to the £250k Xenetron typesetting machines and costing about £245k less could do so much more!  If my memory serves correctly, it had software installed called Pagemaker (later becoming Adobe PageMaker), which enabled me to create formatted page layouts without the need for rulers, scalpels or wax! I even managed to connect it to the PMT machine and print a completed page. I thought it was amazing…the business owners thought it would never catch on and instructed me to return the machine.

And the rest, as they say, is history.

I went on to work as a graphic designer initially within the printing division of Essex County Council, then after that within a small print franchise in Chelmsford. My job title then was “Desktop Publisher” rather than a graphic designer.

Before becoming a freelance graphic designer, I worked within the marketing department of a blue-chip company in Brentwood in Essex, providing them with an in-house graphic design function. During my time there, St Tim Berners-Lee and the internet changed not only the world but also my skill set. I soon was creating intranet sites and websites…I was becoming a web designer as well as a graphic designer.

I left the blue-chip to work as a freelance graphic and web designer and worked as such for a couple of years before being given the opportunity in 2000 to lecture in Further Education where I gained a teaching qualification. Whilst I loved teaching, I quickly became very jaded with Education and in 2005 decided to go back to working for myself as a freelance graphic designer and web designer.

Fast forward 11 successful years to when in 2014 I set up “Mr Mears Ltd” and starting trading as Mears Websites, a web design and hosting brand that I wanted people to associate with quality, professionalism and reliability.

Whilst I am very happy with the successes of Mears Websites and the new clients it has attracted, I am mindful that in actual fact people still fundamentally buy from “David Mears”, which I’m also very happy with. I now run Mears Websites as well as promoting myself as a freelance graphic designer.

I have invested in technology, equipment and software that enables me to stay current and deliver graphic design projects in all industry-standard formats. I’m based in Essex, but with today’s communication technology I can work with you, wherever you are in the world.

If you are looking for a freelance graphic designer with the experience and skills I possess, it would be great to hear from you.